Event Title

Reconstructing Seville: A Translation and Contextualization of Capital Sur

Presenter Information

Hannah Varadi, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A154

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-24-2015 2:45 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 3:45 PM

Abstract

In this project, I compare modern translation theories with my own approach to translating Eduardo del Campo’s Capital Sur (2011) into English. I analyze the novel’s sociopolitical and historical context, showing Seville as a barometer of Spain’s economic and social collapse of the 1990s. I also examine how the novel’s modular narrative structure reflects the author’s reporting background, the stylistic influences of New Journalism, and the Latin American biographical genre of the crónica. Finally, I demonstrate how we can use this novel to critically reexamine the hegemonic industry of translation publishing in the United Sates.

Notes

Session 2, Panel 8 - Interpretation / Composition / Reception: Meditations on Translation
Moderator: Sebastiaan Faber, Professor of Hispanic Studies

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin1435008097

Major

Comparative Literature

Advisor(s)

Sebastiaan Faber, Hispanic Studies
Azita Osanloo, Creative Writing

Project Mentor(s)

Sebastiaan Faber, Hispanic Studies
Azita Osanloo, Creative Writing

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Apr 24th, 2:45 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Reconstructing Seville: A Translation and Contextualization of Capital Sur

Science Center, A154

In this project, I compare modern translation theories with my own approach to translating Eduardo del Campo’s Capital Sur (2011) into English. I analyze the novel’s sociopolitical and historical context, showing Seville as a barometer of Spain’s economic and social collapse of the 1990s. I also examine how the novel’s modular narrative structure reflects the author’s reporting background, the stylistic influences of New Journalism, and the Latin American biographical genre of the crónica. Finally, I demonstrate how we can use this novel to critically reexamine the hegemonic industry of translation publishing in the United Sates.