Event Title

Access and Activism: Reproductive Health at Oberlin College, 1960-1980

Presenter Information

Brittany Craig, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A154

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 2:45 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 3:45 PM

Abstract

This research traces how, at Oberlin College, the reproductive rights movement was first born within the women’s liberation movement and later emerged as an autonomous social movement. I use oral histories, archival documents, and student publications to paint a picture of Oberlin women’s activism as a particular representation of American second wave feminism with characteristic motivations, tactics, and goals. From 1960 to 1980, reproductive rights activism formed through discussions of institutional sexism, development of a feminist vocabulary, and evolving sexual mores. Reproductive rights activism existed in dialogue and overlapping membership with campus feminism, but maintained its own constituency, practices, and objectives.

Notes

Session II, Panel 6: Written on the Body: Inscriptions of Gender, Racialization, and Student Activism
Moderator: Greggor Mattson, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Major

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies; History

Advisor(s)

Zeinab Abul-Magd, History

Project Mentor(s)

Carol Lasser, History

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Apr 26th, 2:45 PM Apr 26th, 3:45 PM

Access and Activism: Reproductive Health at Oberlin College, 1960-1980

Science Center, A154

This research traces how, at Oberlin College, the reproductive rights movement was first born within the women’s liberation movement and later emerged as an autonomous social movement. I use oral histories, archival documents, and student publications to paint a picture of Oberlin women’s activism as a particular representation of American second wave feminism with characteristic motivations, tactics, and goals. From 1960 to 1980, reproductive rights activism formed through discussions of institutional sexism, development of a feminist vocabulary, and evolving sexual mores. Reproductive rights activism existed in dialogue and overlapping membership with campus feminism, but maintained its own constituency, practices, and objectives.