Event Title

General Music Classrooms: Where Neurodiversity Meets Neurotypicality

Presenter Information

Ryn McWhirter, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 127

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2019 5:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2019 6:20 PM

Abstract

How do neurodiverse children engage with music? This Senior Capstone will explore both how music can break through the barriers holding autistic children back from interacting with the neurotypical world, and how creating a neurodiversity-inclusive classroom benefits the neurodiverse and neurotypical children in it. In this project, I will examine and implement pedagogical strategies for teachers with autistic and/or neurodiverse elementary-aged children in their general music classrooms. The implications of this research go beyond bringing more music into young autists lives: it explores the importance of giving autistic people a voice through integration in a neurotypical classroom, as well as showing their neurotypical peers just how much they bring to the table. In a controlled teaching environment, music can jump-start the process of giving young autistic people tools for self-advocacy that they can use throughout their lifetime.

Keywords:

pedagogy, music education, music, neurodiversity, inclusive classrooms

Notes

Session VII, Panel 23 - Music | Education

Moderator: Jody Kerchner, Professor of Music Education and Director of the Division of Pedagogy, Advocacy, and Community Engagement

Major

Musical Studies; Pre-Medicine

Advisor(s)

Jody Kerchner, Music Education
Justin Crowley, Premedical Program Director

Project Mentor(s)

Jody Kerchner, Music Education
Kathryn Metz, Ethnomusicology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 27th, 5:00 PM Apr 27th, 6:20 PM

General Music Classrooms: Where Neurodiversity Meets Neurotypicality

King Building 127

How do neurodiverse children engage with music? This Senior Capstone will explore both how music can break through the barriers holding autistic children back from interacting with the neurotypical world, and how creating a neurodiversity-inclusive classroom benefits the neurodiverse and neurotypical children in it. In this project, I will examine and implement pedagogical strategies for teachers with autistic and/or neurodiverse elementary-aged children in their general music classrooms. The implications of this research go beyond bringing more music into young autists lives: it explores the importance of giving autistic people a voice through integration in a neurotypical classroom, as well as showing their neurotypical peers just how much they bring to the table. In a controlled teaching environment, music can jump-start the process of giving young autistic people tools for self-advocacy that they can use throughout their lifetime.