Event Title

The Nominally Morphological Behavior of the Intejection 'Ori' in Hiaki

Location

King Building 123

Start Date

4-27-2018 5:30 PM

End Date

4-27-2018 6:50 PM

Abtract

We do not always know exactly what we are going to say before we say it. You might pause to think, stumble with your words. Umm… Hiaki, an indigenous language spoken in northwest Mexico and southern Arizona, has a word for this, 'ori.' And it behaves just like it does in English of the time. However, based on our observation of its various uses, our current hypothesis expands upon previous claims about this lexeme. 'Ori' may be a noun because it can take noun endings. Most of these examples are when a speaker is trying to think of a specific word, which we will call the referent. 'Ori' is also often used as an interjection meaning ‘um’ with no particular referent. We will present our findings on the syntactic uses of 'ori.' We hope to back the claim that the category of ‘noun’ in languages like English is not universally applicable to other languages, such as Hiaki.

Keywords:

Hiaki, morphology, syntax, affix

Notes

FEATURED PRESENTATION
Session VII, Panel 18 - Narrative | Interjections
Moderator: Gillian Johns, Associate Professor of English

Record for James Fleming. Additional records for Laura Jingyi Li: https://digitalcommons.oberlin.edu/seniorsymp/2018/presentations/74/; Nina Lorence-Ganong: https://digitalcommons.oberlin.edu/seniorsymp/2018/presentations/75/

Major

Linguistics (IM); Religious Studies

Advisor(s)

Jason Haugen, Anthropology
Paul Thibodeau, Psychology
Mohammad Jafar Mahallati, Religion; Middle East & North Africa Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Jason Haugen, Anthropology

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Apr 27th, 5:30 PM Apr 27th, 6:50 PM

The Nominally Morphological Behavior of the Intejection 'Ori' in Hiaki

King Building 123

We do not always know exactly what we are going to say before we say it. You might pause to think, stumble with your words. Umm… Hiaki, an indigenous language spoken in northwest Mexico and southern Arizona, has a word for this, 'ori.' And it behaves just like it does in English of the time. However, based on our observation of its various uses, our current hypothesis expands upon previous claims about this lexeme. 'Ori' may be a noun because it can take noun endings. Most of these examples are when a speaker is trying to think of a specific word, which we will call the referent. 'Ori' is also often used as an interjection meaning ‘um’ with no particular referent. We will present our findings on the syntactic uses of 'ori.' We hope to back the claim that the category of ‘noun’ in languages like English is not universally applicable to other languages, such as Hiaki.