Event Title

Understanding Film Sound Through Musical Theory

Location

King Building 127

Start Date

4-27-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

4-27-2018 12:20 PM

Abtract

The purpose of this project is to investigate the relationship between embodied cognition and film sound through a focus on a form of musical theory. Developed by Arnie Cox, a music theorist, this process moves away from traditional music theory, exploring the psychology and affect of a listener to offer a framework to discuss any music with ease. I believe that Cox’s ideas extend to sound design in film. Scholarship on this topic is rare, and seldom provides effective ways to talk about and understand film sound. I will explore whether – through the lens of Cox’s theory – the ineffable can become more expressible. I will analyze multiple filmic examples as well as affective responses to a film scene for which I will design the sound. These evaluations will include my own reactions, as well as those of a focus group instructed in Cox’s method. I will detail how the understanding of film sound through this analytical methodology contrasts with previous analytic processes.

Keywords:

film sound, embodied cognition, music theory

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Musical | Affect
Moderator: Arnie Cox, Associate Professor of Music Theory

Major

Musical Studies; Cinema Studies

Advisor(s)

Rebecca Leydon, Music Theory
William Patrick Day, Cinema Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Kathryn Metz, Ethnomusicology

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:20 PM

Understanding Film Sound Through Musical Theory

King Building 127

The purpose of this project is to investigate the relationship between embodied cognition and film sound through a focus on a form of musical theory. Developed by Arnie Cox, a music theorist, this process moves away from traditional music theory, exploring the psychology and affect of a listener to offer a framework to discuss any music with ease. I believe that Cox’s ideas extend to sound design in film. Scholarship on this topic is rare, and seldom provides effective ways to talk about and understand film sound. I will explore whether – through the lens of Cox’s theory – the ineffable can become more expressible. I will analyze multiple filmic examples as well as affective responses to a film scene for which I will design the sound. These evaluations will include my own reactions, as well as those of a focus group instructed in Cox’s method. I will detail how the understanding of film sound through this analytical methodology contrasts with previous analytic processes.