Event Title

Codeswitching in Hiaki Conversational Discourse: An Evaluation of Myers-Scotton's Matrix Language Frame Model

Location

King Building 327

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-28-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 4:20 PM

Abstract

Through the lens of Hiaki-Spanish codeswitching, this paper provides evidence that the languages that engage in bilingual codeswitching are grammatically asymmetrical. With the exception of a few counterexamples addressed at the end, this research supports Myers-Scotton’s theory that the surface word order and certain types of morphemes should always come from the grammatically “dominant” language (the Matrix Language) in mixed language constituents. If the other (Embedded Language) contributes morphemes that violate either of these principles, the remainder of its constituent must be finished in that language. Although the Hiaki language has been thoroughly studied, this study is one of the first on codeswitching in Hiaki. It is also one of the first studies of naturally occurring discourse in Hiaki, as most of the previous research on Hiaki has been based on elicitation.

Keywords:

Hiaki, codeswitching, linguistics, Spanish, Mexico, anthropology

Notes

Session II, Panel 12 - Switching | Discourse
Moderator: Jason Haugen, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin149570804750898

Major

Anthropology

Award

Selch Fellowship for the Study of American Culture

Advisor(s)

Jason Haugen, Anthropology

Project Mentor(s)

Jason Haugen, Anthropology

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:20 PM

Codeswitching in Hiaki Conversational Discourse: An Evaluation of Myers-Scotton's Matrix Language Frame Model

King Building 327

Through the lens of Hiaki-Spanish codeswitching, this paper provides evidence that the languages that engage in bilingual codeswitching are grammatically asymmetrical. With the exception of a few counterexamples addressed at the end, this research supports Myers-Scotton’s theory that the surface word order and certain types of morphemes should always come from the grammatically “dominant” language (the Matrix Language) in mixed language constituents. If the other (Embedded Language) contributes morphemes that violate either of these principles, the remainder of its constituent must be finished in that language. Although the Hiaki language has been thoroughly studied, this study is one of the first on codeswitching in Hiaki. It is also one of the first studies of naturally occurring discourse in Hiaki, as most of the previous research on Hiaki has been based on elicitation.