Event Title

Between and Beyond the Binary: Gender Pronouns and Community Support

Location

King Building 341

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-28-2017 4:30 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 5:50 PM

Abstract

This ethnographic project explores trans identities that exist beyond and outside of the gender binary, through an analysis of the use of non normative pronouns (eg the singular they, sie/zie/hir, or opting to use one’s name as a pronoun). Trans- embodiment is largely understood as changing genders, the journey across the binary, from female-to-male or male-to-female, with “passing” as a cisgender man or woman marking the finish line. This project seeks to understand how trans gender identifications are both upheld by community understanding and restrained by a lack thereof. How is one’s ability to identify as a gender other than man or woman, influenced by community support and awareness? This question is explored in the qualitative thematic analysis of 15 in-depth interviews of participants that hold various gender identities and use a range of pronouns at Oberlin College and in the greater Washington, DC area.

Keywords:

non-binary, trans*, pronouns, they, community

Notes

Session III, Panel 16 - Marginalized | Communities
Moderator: Greggor Mattson, Director of Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies and Associate Professor of Sociology

Major

Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies

Advisor(s)

Wendy Kozol, Comparative American Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Patrick O'Connor, Hispanic Studies; Comparative Literature
Greggor Mattson, Sociology
Crystal Biruk, Anthropology
Chris Barcelos, Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies

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Apr 28th, 4:30 PM Apr 28th, 5:50 PM

Between and Beyond the Binary: Gender Pronouns and Community Support

King Building 341

This ethnographic project explores trans identities that exist beyond and outside of the gender binary, through an analysis of the use of non normative pronouns (eg the singular they, sie/zie/hir, or opting to use one’s name as a pronoun). Trans- embodiment is largely understood as changing genders, the journey across the binary, from female-to-male or male-to-female, with “passing” as a cisgender man or woman marking the finish line. This project seeks to understand how trans gender identifications are both upheld by community understanding and restrained by a lack thereof. How is one’s ability to identify as a gender other than man or woman, influenced by community support and awareness? This question is explored in the qualitative thematic analysis of 15 in-depth interviews of participants that hold various gender identities and use a range of pronouns at Oberlin College and in the greater Washington, DC area.