Event Title

Ninety Seconds in Charleston: How Historical Memory and Myth Sustain Racial Inequality in America

Presenter Information

Kaia Diringer, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 323

Start Date

4-28-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 2:50 PM

Abtract

This presentation will describe Creary's process as she wrote the first English translation of Theodor Gottlieb von Hippel's Der Mann nach der Uhr, oder der ordentliche Mann, an 18th-century German play about a strict father who disapproves of his daughter's suitor. Specifically, Creary will outline the challenges of adapting a play with outdated ideology for performance today. Along these lines, Creary will focus on Hippel’s progressive beliefs about women of his time. Finally, she will describe the process of turning this play into an opera libretto.

Keywords:

history, memory, American South, race, justice, memorialization

Notes

Session I, Panel 1 - Anti-Black | Racism
Moderator: RaShelle Peck, Faculty in Residence, Afrikan Heritage House

Major

History

Award

Artz Honors Research Grant; Jerome Davis Research Award

Advisor(s)

Matthew Bahar, History

Project Mentor(s)

Renee Romano, History
Annemarie Sammartino, History

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 2:50 PM

Ninety Seconds in Charleston: How Historical Memory and Myth Sustain Racial Inequality in America

King Building 323

This presentation will describe Creary's process as she wrote the first English translation of Theodor Gottlieb von Hippel's Der Mann nach der Uhr, oder der ordentliche Mann, an 18th-century German play about a strict father who disapproves of his daughter's suitor. Specifically, Creary will outline the challenges of adapting a play with outdated ideology for performance today. Along these lines, Creary will focus on Hippel’s progressive beliefs about women of his time. Finally, she will describe the process of turning this play into an opera libretto.