Event Title

Dimension to Virtual Reality: Ear-eye Coordination with Frequency-responsive Beam Tracing

Location

King Building 341

Start Date

4-29-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

4-29-2016 5:15 PM

Abstract

My project presents elaborations upon the acoustical beam tracing algorithm. Beam tracing for audio approximates reverberation filters present in physical architectural scenes by analyzing digital models of those scenes to compose the impulse responses of those filters. The algorithm as originally presented takes into account some of the acoustic absorption properties of the materials making up the scene. However, it has been previously assumed that each surface that reflects or transmits sound does so at an even distribution across the space of audible frequencies. I describe a method for incorporating non-flat frequency responses of surfaces, which resolves this shortcoming.

Notes

Session III, Panel 16 - On Surfaces and Edges: Using Numbers to Make Sense of Sound, Time, and Patterns
Moderator: Bob Geitz, Associate Professor of Computer Science

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin1462957979

Major

Computer Science; TIMARA

Advisor(s)

Bob Geitz, Computer Science

Project Mentor(s)

Bob Geitz, Computer Science

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Apr 29th, 4:00 PM Apr 29th, 5:15 PM

Dimension to Virtual Reality: Ear-eye Coordination with Frequency-responsive Beam Tracing

King Building 341

My project presents elaborations upon the acoustical beam tracing algorithm. Beam tracing for audio approximates reverberation filters present in physical architectural scenes by analyzing digital models of those scenes to compose the impulse responses of those filters. The algorithm as originally presented takes into account some of the acoustic absorption properties of the materials making up the scene. However, it has been previously assumed that each surface that reflects or transmits sound does so at an even distribution across the space of audible frequencies. I describe a method for incorporating non-flat frequency responses of surfaces, which resolves this shortcoming.