Event Title

The Effects of the Munich Visiting Program on German-Jewish Memory of the Holocaust, 1960-1972

Presenter Information

Jesse Gamoran, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 343

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-29-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

4-29-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

In 1960, during a resurgence of anti-Semitism, the Munich government initiated a program to invite Jewish former residents of Munich (who left during the 1930s due to the Nazis) back to their hometown for two-week visits. This program offered the participants a chance to reminisce about their childhoods, reconnect with their heritage, and visit their former communities. For the government, this program provided a crucial connection between the old pre-war Munich and the new Munich of the 1960s, between Munich as the birthplace of National Socialism and Munich as a newly rebuilt city, ready to move forward from the Holocaust.

Notes

Session I, Panel 6 - The Production of Space: Studies of Ethnicity, Identity, and Place
Moderator: Wendy Kozol, Professor of Comparative American Studies

Full text thesis available here.

Major

German; History; Jewish Studies

Advisor(s)

Elizabeth Hamilton, German
Leonard Smith, History
Abe Socher, Jewish Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Annemarie Sammartino, History

April 2016

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 2:30 PM

The Effects of the Munich Visiting Program on German-Jewish Memory of the Holocaust, 1960-1972

King Building 343

In 1960, during a resurgence of anti-Semitism, the Munich government initiated a program to invite Jewish former residents of Munich (who left during the 1930s due to the Nazis) back to their hometown for two-week visits. This program offered the participants a chance to reminisce about their childhoods, reconnect with their heritage, and visit their former communities. For the government, this program provided a crucial connection between the old pre-war Munich and the new Munich of the 1960s, between Munich as the birthplace of National Socialism and Munich as a newly rebuilt city, ready to move forward from the Holocaust.