Event Title

Northern Goshawk Diversity and Connectivity Among the Forests of the Northern Great Basin

Presenter Information

Stephanie Szarmach, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A255

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-24-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 5:30 PM

Abstract

Even highly mobile species like birds can fail to disperse across fragmented landscapes. Within the naturally fragmented forests of the northern Great Basin, unique species such as the South Hills Crossbill, have evolved in isolation, and other species there may exhibit unique genetic diversity. Because the Northern Goshawk has shown low integration between geographically dispersed populations elsewhere in its range, we compared microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA sequences among individuals in five forest islands in south-central Idaho to search for signs of historical isolation. Our work provides a foundation for understanding the genetic ecology of goshawks in the Great Basin.

Notes

Session 3, Panel 18 - Nature vs. Nurture Remixed: Studies in Regulation, Regeneration, Isolation, and Degradation
Moderator: Gunnar Kwakye, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

Major

Biology; Environmental Studies

Advisor(s)

John Petersen, Environmental Studies
Angie Roles, Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Angie Roles, Biology

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:30 PM

Northern Goshawk Diversity and Connectivity Among the Forests of the Northern Great Basin

Science Center, A255

Even highly mobile species like birds can fail to disperse across fragmented landscapes. Within the naturally fragmented forests of the northern Great Basin, unique species such as the South Hills Crossbill, have evolved in isolation, and other species there may exhibit unique genetic diversity. Because the Northern Goshawk has shown low integration between geographically dispersed populations elsewhere in its range, we compared microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA sequences among individuals in five forest islands in south-central Idaho to search for signs of historical isolation. Our work provides a foundation for understanding the genetic ecology of goshawks in the Great Basin.