Event Title

Hildegard of Bingen’s Music and Unknown Language

Presenter Information

Sarah Kahn, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A254

Start Date

4-24-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 5:30 PM

Abtract

The rare and distinctive intersections of two of Hildegard of Bingen’s projects, her music and created language, can offer unique insights into her work. I examine the probable liturgical use of her language and alphabet in the consecration of her Rupertsberg church and interpret its use as an act of ritualistic naming. I argue that the antiphon using her created words supports this interpretation. While previous scholarship finds her language to be experimental or marginal to her work, I argue that her language and alphabet, especially within her music, served an important function in the consecration of Hildegard’s Rupertsberg church.

Notes

Session 3, Panel 17 - From Whence the Word: Studies of Sound and Etymology
Moderator: Marcelo Vinces, Director of Center for Learning, Education and Research in the Sciences (CLEAR)

Major

Musical Studies; Religion

Advisor(s)

Steven Plank, Musical Studies
Margaret Kamitsuka, Religion

Project Mentor(s)

Steven Plank, Musical Studies
Margaret Kamitsuka, Religion

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:30 PM

Hildegard of Bingen’s Music and Unknown Language

Science Center, A254

The rare and distinctive intersections of two of Hildegard of Bingen’s projects, her music and created language, can offer unique insights into her work. I examine the probable liturgical use of her language and alphabet in the consecration of her Rupertsberg church and interpret its use as an act of ritualistic naming. I argue that the antiphon using her created words supports this interpretation. While previous scholarship finds her language to be experimental or marginal to her work, I argue that her language and alphabet, especially within her music, served an important function in the consecration of Hildegard’s Rupertsberg church.