Event Title

Tracing the Language of Multiracialism in Postwar Japan

Location

Science Center, A255

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-24-2015 2:45 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 3:45 PM

Abstract

Japan is often perceived as culturally, ethnically, and racially homogenous. In reality, diverse groups comprise Japanese society. Drawing from literature in anthropology and sociology, this study explores the presence of mixed-race Japanese, a relatively new class, following the end of World War II. Using terminology for multiracials as a lens, I seek to define the contours of national identity by exploring who has historically been allowed to be Japanese, who has not, and how conceptions of identity may change in the future.

Notes

Session 2, Panel 11 - Bilateralism, Language, and Identity: Case Studies from Asia
Moderator: Marc Blecher, Professor of Politics

Major

East Asian Studies; Politics

Advisor(s)

Marc Blecher, Politics

Project Mentor(s)

Emer O’Dwyer, East Asian Studies

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Apr 24th, 2:45 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Tracing the Language of Multiracialism in Postwar Japan

Science Center, A255

Japan is often perceived as culturally, ethnically, and racially homogenous. In reality, diverse groups comprise Japanese society. Drawing from literature in anthropology and sociology, this study explores the presence of mixed-race Japanese, a relatively new class, following the end of World War II. Using terminology for multiracials as a lens, I seek to define the contours of national identity by exploring who has historically been allowed to be Japanese, who has not, and how conceptions of identity may change in the future.