Event Title

German-Persian Connections: Goethe and Hafez in Dialogue in West-östlicher Divan

Presenter Information

Caroline de Vries, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, K209

Start Date

4-24-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 2:30 PM

Abtract

Goethe wrote West-östlicher Divan between 1814 and 1819 after reading the divan of Hafez, a 14th-century Persian Sufi poet. Goethe draws many parallels between Hafez and himself, and wrote in an announcement of his work that he “may himself be a Muslim.” This paper examines the significance of this work in a dialogue over time, culture, language, and religion. With Goethe and Hafez celebrated as key literary figures in Germany and Iran, this paper examines the implications for the realm of peacemaking between east and west. It seeks to build connections between the German and Muslim worlds through these two literary pillars.

Notes

Session 1, Panel 5 - The Agency of Interpretation: Reflections on Jesus, Goethe, and Evangelical Christianity
Moderator: Rebecca Leydon, Associate Professor of Music Theory

Major

Comparative Literature; Environmental Studies; German Studies

Advisor(s)

Jed Deppman, Comparative Literature

Project Mentor(s)

Jafar Mahallati, Religion

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Apr 24th, 1:30 PM Apr 24th, 2:30 PM

German-Persian Connections: Goethe and Hafez in Dialogue in West-östlicher Divan

Science Center, K209

Goethe wrote West-östlicher Divan between 1814 and 1819 after reading the divan of Hafez, a 14th-century Persian Sufi poet. Goethe draws many parallels between Hafez and himself, and wrote in an announcement of his work that he “may himself be a Muslim.” This paper examines the significance of this work in a dialogue over time, culture, language, and religion. With Goethe and Hafez celebrated as key literary figures in Germany and Iran, this paper examines the implications for the realm of peacemaking between east and west. It seeks to build connections between the German and Muslim worlds through these two literary pillars.