Event Title

Histological Changes in Monodelphis domestica Uteri During Pregnancy

Presenter Information

Karin Yoshida, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A155

Start Date

4-25-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 2:30 PM

Abtract

Pregnancy is possible because biochemical adjustments prevent immunological rejection of the embryo, which the maternal body recognizes as an alien tissue. A protein called early pregnancy factor (EPF) suppresses the maternal immune system just enough to prevent expulsion of the embryo without harming the mother. Additionally, progesterone modifies the reproductive system to become a more suitable environment for fetal development. I examine prepared and stained slices of uteri from pregnant and non-pregnant opossums (Monodelphis domestica) to determine if the known changes in progesterone and EPF levels in these animals correspond to microanatomical changes in uterine tissues and cells.

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Meiosis, Memory, Mutation: Studies in Reproduction, Menopause, and Ovarian Cancer
Moderator: Tracie Paine, Associate Professor of Neuroscience

Major

Biology

Advisor(s)

Jane Bennett, Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Yolanda P. Cruz, Biology

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Apr 25th, 1:30 PM Apr 25th, 2:30 PM

Histological Changes in Monodelphis domestica Uteri During Pregnancy

Science Center, A155

Pregnancy is possible because biochemical adjustments prevent immunological rejection of the embryo, which the maternal body recognizes as an alien tissue. A protein called early pregnancy factor (EPF) suppresses the maternal immune system just enough to prevent expulsion of the embryo without harming the mother. Additionally, progesterone modifies the reproductive system to become a more suitable environment for fetal development. I examine prepared and stained slices of uteri from pregnant and non-pregnant opossums (Monodelphis domestica) to determine if the known changes in progesterone and EPF levels in these animals correspond to microanatomical changes in uterine tissues and cells.