Event Title

"God Knows What I Know": Trans-Eurasian Influence on the Sacred-Secular Conflict in 13th Century Europe

Presenter Information

Matthew Kendrick, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, K209

Start Date

4-25-2014 4:00 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 5:15 PM

Abtract

This project explores the effect of the Papal Embassy to the Mongols, from 1245-1247, led by Friar John of Plano Carpini, upon the conflict between the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy. I argue that Pope Innocent IV saw the Mongols as an apocalyptic foe and, when he was informed of their bellicose preparations against Europe, he made the difficult decision to go to war with Frederick II of the Holy Roman Empire. At the root of this decision, I suggest, was the Pope’s fear that the Mongols would be able to exploit intra-European division and destroy Christendom.

Notes

Session III, Panel 16 - “A city set on a hill cannot be hid”: Studies of Religious Authority
Moderator: Steven Wojtal, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Geology

Major

East Asian Studies; History

Advisor(s)

David Kelley, East Asian Studies; History

Project Mentor(s)

Ellen Wurtzel, History

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Apr 25th, 4:00 PM Apr 25th, 5:15 PM

"God Knows What I Know": Trans-Eurasian Influence on the Sacred-Secular Conflict in 13th Century Europe

Science Center, K209

This project explores the effect of the Papal Embassy to the Mongols, from 1245-1247, led by Friar John of Plano Carpini, upon the conflict between the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy. I argue that Pope Innocent IV saw the Mongols as an apocalyptic foe and, when he was informed of their bellicose preparations against Europe, he made the difficult decision to go to war with Frederick II of the Holy Roman Empire. At the root of this decision, I suggest, was the Pope’s fear that the Mongols would be able to exploit intra-European division and destroy Christendom.