Event Title

Art as Communication Objects in a Practice-Centered Account of Albrecht Durer

Presenter Information

Elias Wright, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-25-2014 2:45 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 3:45 PM

Abstract

I suggest that interpreting Durer’s art objects using a practice-centered interpretation in conjunction with a belief-centered account demonstrates how art objects can communicate and shape social values and structure. I use Erwin Panofsky’s interpretation of Durer’s “St. Jerome in His Study” to articulate the narrative features in a work of art and to examine how Durer’s art objects are placed in a larger artistic practice. From this, I argue that religious art as “representational” can only be understood in conjunction with its status as a shared social form. I investigate the implications and abilities of an “art-object” to serve as a communication object, structuring relationships and changing beliefs and organization in practicing communities.

Notes

Session II, Panel 8 - Enigmatic Art Objects: Case Studies of Social Practice, Tricksters, and Patronage
Moderator: Susan Kane, Mildred C. Jay Professor of Art and Classical Archaeology

Major

Art History; Religion

Advisor(s)

Susan Kane, Art History
James Swan Tuite, Religion

Project Mentor(s)

David Kamitsuka, Religion

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Apr 25th, 2:45 PM Apr 25th, 3:45 PM

Art as Communication Objects in a Practice-Centered Account of Albrecht Durer

Science Center, A254

I suggest that interpreting Durer’s art objects using a practice-centered interpretation in conjunction with a belief-centered account demonstrates how art objects can communicate and shape social values and structure. I use Erwin Panofsky’s interpretation of Durer’s “St. Jerome in His Study” to articulate the narrative features in a work of art and to examine how Durer’s art objects are placed in a larger artistic practice. From this, I argue that religious art as “representational” can only be understood in conjunction with its status as a shared social form. I investigate the implications and abilities of an “art-object” to serve as a communication object, structuring relationships and changing beliefs and organization in practicing communities.