Event Title

Response of Herbivorous Fish Communities to a New Resource: Insight into Macroalgal Phase Shifts on Coral Reefs

Presenter Information

Christopher Pickens, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A154

Start Date

4-25-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

Herbivores play a key role in the maintenance of algal and coral communities. Reductions in herbivory can cause a shift to a macroalgae dominated system, which decreases the biodiversity and restorative capabilities of coral reefs. An understanding of how herbivorous fish communities respond to macroalgae is crucial to the conservation and management of coral reefs. My project examines the response of both coral fish communities and individual fish species to the experimental introduction of a new resource (macroalgae) at a mid-shelf reef in the Great Barrier Reef.

Notes

Session I, Panel 1 - The Disorder of Things: Conservation and Risk with Cranes, Coral Reefs, and Crayfish
Moderator: Angie Roles, Assistant Professor of Biology

Major

Biology; Geology

Advisor(s)

Mary Garvin, Biology
Dennis Hubbard, Geology

Project Mentor(s)

Angela Roles, Biology

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Apr 25th, 1:30 PM Apr 25th, 2:30 PM

Response of Herbivorous Fish Communities to a New Resource: Insight into Macroalgal Phase Shifts on Coral Reefs

Science Center, A154

Herbivores play a key role in the maintenance of algal and coral communities. Reductions in herbivory can cause a shift to a macroalgae dominated system, which decreases the biodiversity and restorative capabilities of coral reefs. An understanding of how herbivorous fish communities respond to macroalgae is crucial to the conservation and management of coral reefs. My project examines the response of both coral fish communities and individual fish species to the experimental introduction of a new resource (macroalgae) at a mid-shelf reef in the Great Barrier Reef.