Event Title

Virtue of Attunement: Contributions of Yuasa’s Embodied Self-Cultivation Practices to Toadvine’s Ecophenomenology of Difference

Presenter Information

Pailyn Brown, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A262

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 4:00 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

Contemporary environmental ethicists imagine the human-nature relationship as a harmonious web-of-life, and thereby ignore the experience of difference between self and world. Ted Toadvine posits that any environmental ethic must directly address the problem of difference, but does not provide any practical possibilities for the body to explore difference. Yuasa Yasuo proposes instead that through habituated practices, the body can and should be used to understand difference. Yuasa’s concerns for religion, culture, and self-cultivation help to inform Toadvine’s work on the body. By using these two ethicists, I argue that a virtue of attunement is critical to how one can live and act as a responsible body.

Notes

Session III, Panel 16: The Well-Tempered Self and Others: Case Studies in Philosophy and Psychology
Moderator: Cindy Frantz, Associate Professor of Psychology

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin1516467964864505

Major

Religion

Advisor(s)

James Dobbins, Religion

Project Mentor(s)

James Swan Tuite, Religion

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Apr 26th, 4:00 PM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

Virtue of Attunement: Contributions of Yuasa’s Embodied Self-Cultivation Practices to Toadvine’s Ecophenomenology of Difference

Science Center, A262

Contemporary environmental ethicists imagine the human-nature relationship as a harmonious web-of-life, and thereby ignore the experience of difference between self and world. Ted Toadvine posits that any environmental ethic must directly address the problem of difference, but does not provide any practical possibilities for the body to explore difference. Yuasa Yasuo proposes instead that through habituated practices, the body can and should be used to understand difference. Yuasa’s concerns for religion, culture, and self-cultivation help to inform Toadvine’s work on the body. By using these two ethicists, I argue that a virtue of attunement is critical to how one can live and act as a responsible body.