Abstract

This article examines the role of the “racial state” in delimiting the socio-economic mobility of Filipino immigrants in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century. I illustrate how racial statecraft was deployed to restrict the access of Filipino immigrants to citizenship, family formation and land ownership through exclusionary racial criteria. I argue that the state instituted ascribed racial categories as the principal means of differentiating the civic status and social resources available to racialized collectivities. Filipino immigrants in the United States offer an interesting case study because of their status as colonial subjects of the United States. The precarious political and racial status of Filipinos made the enforcement of racial boundaries a complex issue that was contested by both whites and Filipinos and eventually led to a prohibition on Filipino immigration to the United States in the 1930s.

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Publication Date

11-1-2004

Publication Title

Ethnic and Racial Studies

Department

French and Italian

Document Type

Article

DOI

10.1080/0141987042000268558

Document Version

post-print

Language

English

Format

text

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