Event Title

The Role of the Extracellular Matrix in Modulating Muscle Progenitor Cell Behavior in an In VitroModel of Heterotopic Ossification

Presenter Information

Sonam Patel, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 6:00 PM

Research Program

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Poster Number

39

Abstract

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the existence of bone in soft muscle tissue where bone production should not usually occur. HO typically occurs following a traumatic wound injury: approximately 60% of wounded service members that suffer from limb loss or heavy tissue damage develop HO (Shehab, 2002). Such ectopic bone formation results in significant pain, inflammation, and reduced mobility (Shimono, 2013), underlining the need to discover the mechanisms through which HO may occur. One hypothesis is that the excessive scar tissue that results from these injuries promotes the dedifferentiation of resident muscle progenitor cells (MPCs). Once dedifferentiated, they may then redifferentiate into bone-producing cells. Here, we look specifically at how changes in the extracellular matrix affect MPC behavior and gene expression.

Major

Anthropology

Project Mentor(s)

Youngmi Ji, Department of Surgery, and Leon Nesti, Clinical & Experimental Orthopedics Laboratory, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

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Oct 28th, 5:30 PM Oct 28th, 6:00 PM

The Role of the Extracellular Matrix in Modulating Muscle Progenitor Cell Behavior in an In VitroModel of Heterotopic Ossification

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the existence of bone in soft muscle tissue where bone production should not usually occur. HO typically occurs following a traumatic wound injury: approximately 60% of wounded service members that suffer from limb loss or heavy tissue damage develop HO (Shehab, 2002). Such ectopic bone formation results in significant pain, inflammation, and reduced mobility (Shimono, 2013), underlining the need to discover the mechanisms through which HO may occur. One hypothesis is that the excessive scar tissue that results from these injuries promotes the dedifferentiation of resident muscle progenitor cells (MPCs). Once dedifferentiated, they may then redifferentiate into bone-producing cells. Here, we look specifically at how changes in the extracellular matrix affect MPC behavior and gene expression.