Event Title

Determinants of Alumni Giving to a Private U.S. College: Evidence from Oberlin College

Presenter Information

Kenneth Kitahata, Oberlin College

Location

Virtual presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2020 8:00 AM

End Date

5-2-2020 5:00 PM

Abstract

This paper studies the personal characteristics and factors that determine alumni giving using a dataset from Oberlin College from 1974 – 2019. Liberal arts colleges like Oberlin are especially dependent on gifts to cover operating expenses and fund endowments as they don’t receive direct public funding. Using Logit and Tobit regression, I find that females, graduates, age, alumni whose spouse attended Oberlin, being married, and GPA are associated with higher giving. The state charitable tax deduction increases giving on the intensive margin (total amount donated) but not the extensive margin (likelihood to give). Additionally, findings suggest taking longer to graduate and enrollment in the Conservatory are associated with lower giving. Athletics, race, and undergraduate financial aid do not affect giving.

Keywords:

Alumni giving, Charitable giving, Philanthropy, Oberlin College

Notes

Click here to view this presentation at the Office of Undergraduate Research website from April 27-May 2, 2020.

Major

Economics

Project Mentor(s)

Barbara Craig, Economics
Ron Cheung, Economics
Martin Saavedra, Economics
Ken Stark, Office of Advancement
Kassy Wyman, Office of Advancement
Ross Peacock, Office of Institutional Research

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Apr 27th, 8:00 AM May 2nd, 5:00 PM

Determinants of Alumni Giving to a Private U.S. College: Evidence from Oberlin College

Virtual presentation

This paper studies the personal characteristics and factors that determine alumni giving using a dataset from Oberlin College from 1974 – 2019. Liberal arts colleges like Oberlin are especially dependent on gifts to cover operating expenses and fund endowments as they don’t receive direct public funding. Using Logit and Tobit regression, I find that females, graduates, age, alumni whose spouse attended Oberlin, being married, and GPA are associated with higher giving. The state charitable tax deduction increases giving on the intensive margin (total amount donated) but not the extensive margin (likelihood to give). Additionally, findings suggest taking longer to graduate and enrollment in the Conservatory are associated with lower giving. Athletics, race, and undergraduate financial aid do not affect giving.