Event Title

Progression of State & Federal Education Policy, Funding, and Legislation in Public Schools Since 1983

Location

King Building 127

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2019 5:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2019 6:20 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this work is to analyze 1.) the ways in which the Cleveland Metropolitan School District has funded music education in public schools since the 1980’s. 2.) the kinds of musical opportunities that are available to students during the school day and the factors that affect access to those opportunities. 3.) why access to these opportunities is important. As a future music educator, these issues are extremely pertinent to the settings I will find myself in after Oberlin. My research consisted of delving into scholarly journals, books, an Oberlin thesis from 1999, and self-conducted interviews of Clevelanders who grew up in or around the city. From my analysis, I assert that today, students in CMSD do not have adequate opportunities to learn music and that overarching racial dynamics tied to a deep history of segregation contribute significantly to this problem.

Keywords:

Funding, Music, Arts

Notes

Session VII, Panel 23 - Music | Education

Moderator: Jody Kerchner, Professor of Music Education and Director of the Division of Pedagogy, Advocacy, and Community Engagement

Major

Musical Studies

Advisor(s)

Jody Kerchner, Music Education

Project Mentor(s)

Katheryn Metz, Ethnomusicology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 27th, 5:00 PM Apr 27th, 6:20 PM

Progression of State & Federal Education Policy, Funding, and Legislation in Public Schools Since 1983

King Building 127

The purpose of this work is to analyze 1.) the ways in which the Cleveland Metropolitan School District has funded music education in public schools since the 1980’s. 2.) the kinds of musical opportunities that are available to students during the school day and the factors that affect access to those opportunities. 3.) why access to these opportunities is important. As a future music educator, these issues are extremely pertinent to the settings I will find myself in after Oberlin. My research consisted of delving into scholarly journals, books, an Oberlin thesis from 1999, and self-conducted interviews of Clevelanders who grew up in or around the city. From my analysis, I assert that today, students in CMSD do not have adequate opportunities to learn music and that overarching racial dynamics tied to a deep history of segregation contribute significantly to this problem.