Event Title

Debt: What Do We Owe Each Other?

Location

King Building 239

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2019 3:20 PM

Abstract

Debt has reached unprecedented levels in our life time: student loan debt is over a trillion dollars, our nation operates on an almost one trillion dollar annual deficit, and the average consumer makes most major purchases, such as a cars and homes, all on credit. Even though we all feel the effects of debt, it is rarely talked about as a social phenomenon that significantly limits our political imaginations. Tracing a genealogy of debt, from Nietzsche, to Keynes, to contemporary approaches found in Geoff Mann’s "In the Long Run We Are All Dead", we can understand debt as one of the most pressing issues of our time and one of the most promising points of intervention in our economy.

Keywords:

Debt, Political Economy, Keynsianism, Macroeconomics

Notes

Session IV, Panel 9 - Political | Economy
Moderator: Charmaine Chua, Assistant Professor of Politics

Major

Politics; Visual Art

Advisor(s)

Stephen Crowley, Politics
Nanette Yannuzzi-Macias, Art

Project Mentor(s)

Charmain Chua, Politics

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Apr 27th, 2:00 PM Apr 27th, 3:20 PM

Debt: What Do We Owe Each Other?

King Building 239

Debt has reached unprecedented levels in our life time: student loan debt is over a trillion dollars, our nation operates on an almost one trillion dollar annual deficit, and the average consumer makes most major purchases, such as a cars and homes, all on credit. Even though we all feel the effects of debt, it is rarely talked about as a social phenomenon that significantly limits our political imaginations. Tracing a genealogy of debt, from Nietzsche, to Keynes, to contemporary approaches found in Geoff Mann’s "In the Long Run We Are All Dead", we can understand debt as one of the most pressing issues of our time and one of the most promising points of intervention in our economy.