Event Title

Recordando y reconstruyendo una memoria: una crónica del Comité 68 y el Movimiento de 1968 en México

Location

King Building 123

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2019 9:30 AM

End Date

4-27-2019 10:50 AM

Abstract

The world witnessed the unabashed 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre in Mexico City, which has since remained a stain in the country’s history. The murder of those in protest marked the extinguishing of a national student movement that called for the honoring of democratic liberties. The 1968 Student Movement gave light to a new flame, with its essential mission of defending democratic liberties taking the form of the 1968 Committee for Democratic Liberties, or Comité 68. While the committee’s work continues to be largely unrecognized, the committee has solid roots in the struggle of 1968, being founded in 1988 by leaders of the 1968 Student Movement. This essay intends to honor the struggle for democratic liberties in Mexico and the work of Comité 68 through the writing of a chronicle, a recognized mexican literary tradition especially utilized in narrating the 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre.

Keywords:

Collective and National Memory, Student Movements, Social Movements, Dirty War, Global 60s, Authoritarianism, Mexico

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Popular | Propaganda

Moderator: Pablo Mitchell, Professor of History and Comparative American Studies

Major

Hispanic Studies; Comparative Literature

Advisor(s)

Ana Cara, Hispanic Studies
Patrick O'Connor, Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature

Project Mentor(s)

Sergio Gutiérrez Negrón, Hispanic Studies

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Apr 27th, 9:30 AM Apr 27th, 10:50 AM

Recordando y reconstruyendo una memoria: una crónica del Comité 68 y el Movimiento de 1968 en México

King Building 123

The world witnessed the unabashed 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre in Mexico City, which has since remained a stain in the country’s history. The murder of those in protest marked the extinguishing of a national student movement that called for the honoring of democratic liberties. The 1968 Student Movement gave light to a new flame, with its essential mission of defending democratic liberties taking the form of the 1968 Committee for Democratic Liberties, or Comité 68. While the committee’s work continues to be largely unrecognized, the committee has solid roots in the struggle of 1968, being founded in 1988 by leaders of the 1968 Student Movement. This essay intends to honor the struggle for democratic liberties in Mexico and the work of Comité 68 through the writing of a chronicle, a recognized mexican literary tradition especially utilized in narrating the 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre.