Community Engagement through Girls Rock Camps

Athena Matsil, Oberlin College

Session V, Panel 16 - Girl | Power
Moderator: Shelley Lee, Associate Professor and Chair of Comparative American Studies, Associate Professor of History

Abtract

For my capstone, I will conduct an oral history project about the Girls Rock Camp movement,. This project will connect experiences of girls rock methodologies and pedagogies by drawing on interviews with organizers, volunteers, and campers of Girls Rock Camps across the country, including my own personal experience as a facilitator. Most models of Girls Rock camps span the course of a week. In that time, the participants ranging in age from four to eighteen are taught to play instruments, sing, write, and perform music in a band. These camps provide participants with technical skills, creative outlets for self-expression, a means for self-empowerment, and leadership and community building skills. The camps use rock and roll as a tool to examine and combat societal issues of gender inequity, misogyny, and representation. I will develop a prospectus to catalog and chronicle the Girls Rock program that I established in Oberlin, OH during the Spring of 2016 and continues through today. Through the prospectus, I will explore the need for a program like this in Oberlin and I will delve into the methodology of a number of community-engaged theories and methodologies in consideration with my own practices. My prospectus will provide a thorough plan for implementing sustainable practices for Girls Rock, including lesson plans, activities, and a model grant proposal.

 
Apr 27th, 3:00 PM Apr 27th, 4:20 PM

Community Engagement through Girls Rock Camps

King Building 237

For my capstone, I will conduct an oral history project about the Girls Rock Camp movement,. This project will connect experiences of girls rock methodologies and pedagogies by drawing on interviews with organizers, volunteers, and campers of Girls Rock Camps across the country, including my own personal experience as a facilitator. Most models of Girls Rock camps span the course of a week. In that time, the participants ranging in age from four to eighteen are taught to play instruments, sing, write, and perform music in a band. These camps provide participants with technical skills, creative outlets for self-expression, a means for self-empowerment, and leadership and community building skills. The camps use rock and roll as a tool to examine and combat societal issues of gender inequity, misogyny, and representation. I will develop a prospectus to catalog and chronicle the Girls Rock program that I established in Oberlin, OH during the Spring of 2016 and continues through today. Through the prospectus, I will explore the need for a program like this in Oberlin and I will delve into the methodology of a number of community-engaged theories and methodologies in consideration with my own practices. My prospectus will provide a thorough plan for implementing sustainable practices for Girls Rock, including lesson plans, activities, and a model grant proposal.