Event Title

Betwixt Recorded Worlds: Comparing Studio and Live Sound through Musical Affect

Presenter Information

Gus Perkins, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 127

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

4-27-2018 12:20 PM

Abstract

In this project, I will explore musical affect in studio recording and techniques in comparison to live sound. I will also trace the history of technological advancements of some of those techniques. Part research and part analysis, my project will apply Arnie Cox’s mimetic hypothesis and 5x8 framework. I will analyze several case studies, including George Martin’s production contributions to the Beatles, as well as my own music and live performances I have given. I will explore why some listeners prefer listening to studio recordings over live recordings, or vice versa, or prefer both for different reasons. I will conduct a close analysis of the possible kinds of studio sounds, how those sounds compare to the confines of a live performance, and how those differences directly affect the listener’s experience.

Keywords:

music, studio, recording, cognition, affect, producing, engineering, emotion

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Musical | Affect
Moderator: Arnie Cox, Associate Professor of Music Theory

Major

Musical Studies

Advisor(s)

Arnie Cox, Music Theory

Project Mentor(s)

Arnie Cox, Music Theory

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:20 PM

Betwixt Recorded Worlds: Comparing Studio and Live Sound through Musical Affect

King Building 127

In this project, I will explore musical affect in studio recording and techniques in comparison to live sound. I will also trace the history of technological advancements of some of those techniques. Part research and part analysis, my project will apply Arnie Cox’s mimetic hypothesis and 5x8 framework. I will analyze several case studies, including George Martin’s production contributions to the Beatles, as well as my own music and live performances I have given. I will explore why some listeners prefer listening to studio recordings over live recordings, or vice versa, or prefer both for different reasons. I will conduct a close analysis of the possible kinds of studio sounds, how those sounds compare to the confines of a live performance, and how those differences directly affect the listener’s experience.