Presenter Information

Megan Cox, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 239

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2018 4:20 PM

Abstract

Restorative justice is a rapidly growing practice of conflict transformation, reconciliation, and healing. However, public knowledge on restorative justice, its cultural applications, and its social benefits is limited. This four-year project began with personal research into restorative justice, expanded to local and national partnerships, and culminated into the creation of a comprehensive ExCo course with the support of faculty and staff. The course aims to educate students on the theory, practice, and principles of restorative justice. Through both theoretical research as well as hands-on activities, the ExCo challenges our conceptions of justice and encourages a healing-based model of community development. Today, several Oberlin students and staff members are workshopping the course curriculum to refine its content. The intention is to continue offering the ExCo to incoming generations of Oberlin students, thus ensuring the institutionalization of learning about and utilizing restorative practices in everyday life.

Keywords:

restorative justice, historic injustice, social justice, community building, peace and conflict, conflict transformation, reconciliation, healing, social science

Notes

Session V, Panel 15 - Educational | Models
Moderator: Daphne John, Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative American Studies

Major

Politics; Latin American Studies

Advisor(s)

Michael Parkin, Politics
Danielle Terrazas Williams, Latin American Studies; History

Project Mentor(s)

Renee Romano, History
Kim Jackson Davidson, Ombudsperson

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Apr 27th, 3:00 PM Apr 27th, 4:20 PM

Investigating Restorative Justice: A Four-Year Journey

King Building 239

Restorative justice is a rapidly growing practice of conflict transformation, reconciliation, and healing. However, public knowledge on restorative justice, its cultural applications, and its social benefits is limited. This four-year project began with personal research into restorative justice, expanded to local and national partnerships, and culminated into the creation of a comprehensive ExCo course with the support of faculty and staff. The course aims to educate students on the theory, practice, and principles of restorative justice. Through both theoretical research as well as hands-on activities, the ExCo challenges our conceptions of justice and encourages a healing-based model of community development. Today, several Oberlin students and staff members are workshopping the course curriculum to refine its content. The intention is to continue offering the ExCo to incoming generations of Oberlin students, thus ensuring the institutionalization of learning about and utilizing restorative practices in everyday life.