Event Title

Bearing the Dream: Undocumented Students in Higher Education

Location

King Building 101

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2018 3:20 PM

Abstract

I seek to investigate the reason why there are few undocumented students graduating from colleges and universities in the United States despite their institution’s public stance in support of such students. My research’s overall purpose is to find what undocumented students need to succeed in institutions of higher education. Undocumented immigration is embedded in U.S. history. In the past fifteen years, undocumented immigration has been under media scrutiny due to its increased visibility. An increased number of unauthorized migrants are sharing about their status on social media platforms with an attempt to draw attention to the obstacles they face as well as their positive societal contributions. Immigration activists have engaged in social movements to push for legislation that will grant legal status. Higher education institutions have promoted awareness and acceptance. Despite those triumphs, out of the 65,000 undocumented students that graduate from high school, about 5 to 10 percent continue to college. Out of those enrolled in college, 1 to 3 percent graduate.

Keywords:

undocumented, immigration, retention, graduation, higher education

Notes

Session IV, Panel 12 - Student | Success
Moderator: Libni López, Program Coordinator for Undocumented Student Initiatives in the Multicultural Resource Center

Major

Sociology; Psychology

Award

Jerome Davis Research Award

Advisor(s)

Daphne A. John, Sociology
Nancy Darling, Psychology

Project Mentor(s)

Rick Baldoz, Sociology
Greggor Mattson, Sociology

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Apr 27th, 2:00 PM Apr 27th, 3:20 PM

Bearing the Dream: Undocumented Students in Higher Education

King Building 101

I seek to investigate the reason why there are few undocumented students graduating from colleges and universities in the United States despite their institution’s public stance in support of such students. My research’s overall purpose is to find what undocumented students need to succeed in institutions of higher education. Undocumented immigration is embedded in U.S. history. In the past fifteen years, undocumented immigration has been under media scrutiny due to its increased visibility. An increased number of unauthorized migrants are sharing about their status on social media platforms with an attempt to draw attention to the obstacles they face as well as their positive societal contributions. Immigration activists have engaged in social movements to push for legislation that will grant legal status. Higher education institutions have promoted awareness and acceptance. Despite those triumphs, out of the 65,000 undocumented students that graduate from high school, about 5 to 10 percent continue to college. Out of those enrolled in college, 1 to 3 percent graduate.