Event Title

Stories of the Material Record

Location

King Building 227

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2018 2:20 PM

Abstract

This project seeks to tell the stories of six pieces in the collection of the Allen Memorial Art Museum spanning centuries and cultures. Museums rarely have the time or resources to conduct provenance research on previously-acquired objects, a reality doubly applicable for a small museum like the Allen. By using the ever-expanding resource of the internet to communicate with institutions and individuals worldwide — including archives, museums, conservation authorities, and researchers — Stories has found six narratives deeply rooted in their time. These stories speak not only to the state of archaeology, dealership, and museum curation throughout the 20th century, but to under-recognized personal relationships and discoveries, laying bare the often-ignored human element of the discipline.

Keywords:

museums, provenance, material record

Notes

Session III, Panel 8 - Archaeological | Studies
Moderator: Drew Wilburn, Associate Professor and Chair of Classics, Chair of Archaelogical Studies, Irvin E. Houck Associate Professor in the Humanities

Major

Archaeological Studies

Advisor(s)

Drew Wilburn, Archaeological Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Drew Wilburn, Archaeological Studies

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM Apr 27th, 2:20 PM

Stories of the Material Record

King Building 227

This project seeks to tell the stories of six pieces in the collection of the Allen Memorial Art Museum spanning centuries and cultures. Museums rarely have the time or resources to conduct provenance research on previously-acquired objects, a reality doubly applicable for a small museum like the Allen. By using the ever-expanding resource of the internet to communicate with institutions and individuals worldwide — including archives, museums, conservation authorities, and researchers — Stories has found six narratives deeply rooted in their time. These stories speak not only to the state of archaeology, dealership, and museum curation throughout the 20th century, but to under-recognized personal relationships and discoveries, laying bare the often-ignored human element of the discipline.