Event Title

De pura cepa: Seis cuentos

Location

King Building 239

Start Date

4-27-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2018 1:20 PM

Abtract

"De pura cepa" is a collection of six short stories, each in a different time period in Puerto Rican history: the Spanish conquest in the 16th century, the era of slavery and sugar plantations in the mid-19th century, the transition from Spain to the United States in the first years of the 20th century, the start of mass emigrations from Puerto Rico in the mid-20th century, and finally the immediate effects of Hurricane María in the latter half of 2017. There is also an introductory story that takes place in the early 2000s. The collection confronts and interrogates perceptions of Puerto Rico by showing different characters navigate their identities and the struggles they face as Puerto Ricans. The collection is accompanied by a critical commentary, which describes the process of research behind the stories and argues that storytelling serves as a means by which to research and explore Puerto Rico’s cultural history.

Keywords:

Puerto Rico, diaspora, mixed race, creative writing, historical fiction, history, race/ethnicity, Latin America, Caribbean, Spanish

Notes

Session II, Panel 5 - Historias | Latinoamericanas
Moderator: Claire Solomon, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature

Major

Hispanic Studies

Advisor(s)

Claire Solomon, Hispanic Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Sergio Gutiérrez Negrón, Hispanic Studies

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Apr 27th, 12:00 PM Apr 27th, 1:20 PM

De pura cepa: Seis cuentos

King Building 239

"De pura cepa" is a collection of six short stories, each in a different time period in Puerto Rican history: the Spanish conquest in the 16th century, the era of slavery and sugar plantations in the mid-19th century, the transition from Spain to the United States in the first years of the 20th century, the start of mass emigrations from Puerto Rico in the mid-20th century, and finally the immediate effects of Hurricane María in the latter half of 2017. There is also an introductory story that takes place in the early 2000s. The collection confronts and interrogates perceptions of Puerto Rico by showing different characters navigate their identities and the struggles they face as Puerto Ricans. The collection is accompanied by a critical commentary, which describes the process of research behind the stories and argues that storytelling serves as a means by which to research and explore Puerto Rico’s cultural history.