Event Title

Cuban Literature in Translation: Fina García Marruz’s Créditos de Charlot

Presenter Information

Sonia Bloom, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 239

Start Date

4-27-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2018 1:20 PM

Abtract

Begun as the accompaniment to a Spanish-English translation project of Cuban poet Josefina García Marruz’s 1990 collection Créditos de Charlot [Thanks to Charlie], my capstone research investigates the relationship between historical context and the process of literary translation both on the level of the original work and that of the translated work. Specifically, I look at how this particular poetry collection—an homage to film star Charlie Chaplin—can serve as an entry point into Cuban literature’s representation of the changing politics of the second half of the 20th century there as well as what implications translating a work such as this holds for a U.S. audience. This project also seeks to better understand how dynamics in the long history of Cuban-U.S. relations manifest in what literature from Cuba is published in translation in the U.S.

Keywords:

Cuba, poetry, translation, Spanish, politics

Notes

Session II, Panel 5 - Historias | Latinoamericanas
Moderator: Claire Solomon, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature

Major

Comparative Literature; Latin American Studies; Hispanic Studies

Advisor(s)

Claire Solomon, Comparative Literature

Project Mentor(s)

Claire Solomon, Comparative Literature

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Apr 27th, 12:00 PM Apr 27th, 1:20 PM

Cuban Literature in Translation: Fina García Marruz’s Créditos de Charlot

King Building 239

Begun as the accompaniment to a Spanish-English translation project of Cuban poet Josefina García Marruz’s 1990 collection Créditos de Charlot [Thanks to Charlie], my capstone research investigates the relationship between historical context and the process of literary translation both on the level of the original work and that of the translated work. Specifically, I look at how this particular poetry collection—an homage to film star Charlie Chaplin—can serve as an entry point into Cuban literature’s representation of the changing politics of the second half of the 20th century there as well as what implications translating a work such as this holds for a U.S. audience. This project also seeks to better understand how dynamics in the long history of Cuban-U.S. relations manifest in what literature from Cuba is published in translation in the U.S.