Event Title

Documenting Oberlin’s Native Arctic Collection

Location

King Building 341

Start Date

4-28-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 2:50 PM

Abtract

We are exploring a group of 36 cultural objects in the Oberlin College Ethnographic Collection. Collected by naturalists in the late 19th century, the objects hail from Native communities across Alaska and Canada, and made their way to Oberlin College through an exchange with the Smithsonian Institution in 1889. The goal of this research is to document each of the objects (through photography and writing preliminary condition reports) and research their cultural contexts in advance of a planned future physical exhibition on Oberlin’s campus. Our project will culminate in a digital exhibition where students, scholars, and Native communities may view a selection of the objects. The knowledge gained through our research will greatly enhance the information Oberlin has on these special objects and also make them more accessible to the public.

Keywords:

archaeology, indigenous, art, material culture, anthropology, native peoples

Notes

Session I, Panel 4 - Curation | Classification
Moderator: Mir Finkelman, Curatorial Assistant at the Allen Memorial Art Museum

Record for Cori Mazer. Additional record for Alice Blakely: https://digitalcommons.oberlin.edu/seniorsymp/2017/presentations/5/

Major

Archaeological Studies

Advisor(s)

Amy Margaris, Anthropology

Project Mentor(s)

Amy Margaris, Anthropology

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 2:50 PM

Documenting Oberlin’s Native Arctic Collection

King Building 341

We are exploring a group of 36 cultural objects in the Oberlin College Ethnographic Collection. Collected by naturalists in the late 19th century, the objects hail from Native communities across Alaska and Canada, and made their way to Oberlin College through an exchange with the Smithsonian Institution in 1889. The goal of this research is to document each of the objects (through photography and writing preliminary condition reports) and research their cultural contexts in advance of a planned future physical exhibition on Oberlin’s campus. Our project will culminate in a digital exhibition where students, scholars, and Native communities may view a selection of the objects. The knowledge gained through our research will greatly enhance the information Oberlin has on these special objects and also make them more accessible to the public.