Event Title

Whipped Cream, Whiskey, and Weight Loss: Exploring the Versatility of E-cigarette Use in Adolescents and Adults

Location

King Building 306

Document Type

Event

Start Date

4-28-2017 6:15 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 7:00 PM

Abstract

E-cigarettes are gaining popularity among Americans of all ages (King et al., 2014). Research largely has focused on motivations for e-cigarette use that are driven by perceptions that vaping is less harmful than smoking cigarettes. Recently, research has identified motivations for vaping that are applicable to non-smokers. Of note, 13.5% of an online sample of adult e-cigarette users reported vaping to lose or control their weight (Morean & Wedel, 2017). The appeal of vaping to lose weight may disproportionately put individuals who have eating disorders at risk for vaping. Similar to cigarettes, most e-cigarettes contain e-liquid with nicotine, an appetite-suppressant that curbs cravings and increases daily calorie expenditure by approximately 200 calories (Chiolero et al. 2008). It also is possible that vaping serves as a behavioral distraction from hunger or a substitute for eating, similar to cigarettes (Kovacs et al., 2014). Further, e-cigarettes uniquely are available in many flavors that mimic high-calorie or high-fat foods (e.g., chocolate cake; caramel) yet contain no calories, a feature that may appeal to individuals with EDs. For the current study, I collected online data from 400 American adult e-cigarette users (200 with EDs) to determine whether rates of vaping to lose weight are elevated among individuals with EDs. Based on the cigarette smoking literature and on anecdotal evidence obtained from online eating disorder websites, I anticipate that more individuals with EDs will report vaping to lose weight than will individuals without EDs. Potential motives for vaping for weight loss subsequently will be examined.

Notes

Closing Keynote

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin1495644601493472

Major

Psychology

Advisor(s)

Nancy Darling, Psychology

Project Mentor(s)

Meghan Morean, Psychology

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Apr 28th, 6:15 PM Apr 28th, 7:00 PM

Whipped Cream, Whiskey, and Weight Loss: Exploring the Versatility of E-cigarette Use in Adolescents and Adults

King Building 306

E-cigarettes are gaining popularity among Americans of all ages (King et al., 2014). Research largely has focused on motivations for e-cigarette use that are driven by perceptions that vaping is less harmful than smoking cigarettes. Recently, research has identified motivations for vaping that are applicable to non-smokers. Of note, 13.5% of an online sample of adult e-cigarette users reported vaping to lose or control their weight (Morean & Wedel, 2017). The appeal of vaping to lose weight may disproportionately put individuals who have eating disorders at risk for vaping. Similar to cigarettes, most e-cigarettes contain e-liquid with nicotine, an appetite-suppressant that curbs cravings and increases daily calorie expenditure by approximately 200 calories (Chiolero et al. 2008). It also is possible that vaping serves as a behavioral distraction from hunger or a substitute for eating, similar to cigarettes (Kovacs et al., 2014). Further, e-cigarettes uniquely are available in many flavors that mimic high-calorie or high-fat foods (e.g., chocolate cake; caramel) yet contain no calories, a feature that may appeal to individuals with EDs. For the current study, I collected online data from 400 American adult e-cigarette users (200 with EDs) to determine whether rates of vaping to lose weight are elevated among individuals with EDs. Based on the cigarette smoking literature and on anecdotal evidence obtained from online eating disorder websites, I anticipate that more individuals with EDs will report vaping to lose weight than will individuals without EDs. Potential motives for vaping for weight loss subsequently will be examined.