Event Title

The Impact of Music Education on Language Development

Location

King Building 327

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-28-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-28-2017 2:50 PM

Abstract

In recent years, music education has been given less value in the American schooling system, causing decreased student participation and budget cuts (Kratus, 2007). Though many individuals do not support music education in public schools, those that do provide a wide variety of reasons, such as providing an opportunity for students to express themselves and relieve stress (North, Hargreaves & O’Neill, 2000). Beyond these reasons, however, scientific research has found music education to have profound influences on psychological development, including cognitive and creative benefits (Costa-Giomi, 1999). In this project, I will demonstrate how music’s strong influence on language acquisition and development is in itself a convincing argument for the inclusion of music in curricula (Magne et al., 2006; Moreno et al., 2008). I will explore different frameworks of music education, emphasizing the Kodály method and Mary Helen Richard’s expansion on it, discussing how these methods can be particularly influential for language development.

Keywords:

music education, language

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Applied | Music
Moderator: Ben Geyer, Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Theory

Major

Musical Studies; Psychology

Advisor(s)

Ellen Sayles, Musical Studies; Office of the Dean of Studies
Sara Verosky, Psychology

Project Mentor(s)

Ben Geyer, Music Theory

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 2:50 PM

The Impact of Music Education on Language Development

King Building 327

In recent years, music education has been given less value in the American schooling system, causing decreased student participation and budget cuts (Kratus, 2007). Though many individuals do not support music education in public schools, those that do provide a wide variety of reasons, such as providing an opportunity for students to express themselves and relieve stress (North, Hargreaves & O’Neill, 2000). Beyond these reasons, however, scientific research has found music education to have profound influences on psychological development, including cognitive and creative benefits (Costa-Giomi, 1999). In this project, I will demonstrate how music’s strong influence on language acquisition and development is in itself a convincing argument for the inclusion of music in curricula (Magne et al., 2006; Moreno et al., 2008). I will explore different frameworks of music education, emphasizing the Kodály method and Mary Helen Richard’s expansion on it, discussing how these methods can be particularly influential for language development.