Event Title

The Relationship Between Fat-centric Programming and the Anti-fat Stigma

Presenter Information

Briana Thompson, Oberlin College

Location

King Building 323

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-29-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

4-29-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

This project investigates the relationship between TV viewing patterns, viewer demographics, and support for policies that are likely related to feelings about obesity. Reality competitions, docu-series and similar fat-centric programming claim to promote understanding of participants by bringing this stigmatized group to primetime viewers’ attention. My work challenges this commonly accepted notion. This study suggests that a random sample of American’s media consumption patterns predicts an anti-fat prejudice, which may be covertly affecting support for policies aimed at addressing the so-called “obesity epidemic.”

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Case Studies in Power, Knowledge, and Narrative
Moderator: Randal Doane, Assistant Dean of Studies

Major

Psychology

Advisor(s)

Al Porterfield, Psychology

Project Mentor(s)

Paul Thibodeau, Psychology

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 2:30 PM

The Relationship Between Fat-centric Programming and the Anti-fat Stigma

King Building 323

This project investigates the relationship between TV viewing patterns, viewer demographics, and support for policies that are likely related to feelings about obesity. Reality competitions, docu-series and similar fat-centric programming claim to promote understanding of participants by bringing this stigmatized group to primetime viewers’ attention. My work challenges this commonly accepted notion. This study suggests that a random sample of American’s media consumption patterns predicts an anti-fat prejudice, which may be covertly affecting support for policies aimed at addressing the so-called “obesity epidemic.”