Event Title

Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Towards Transgender People: The Role of Demographic and Psychosocial Variables

Location

King Building 337

Start Date

4-29-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

4-29-2016 5:15 PM

Abtract

Although transgender visibility is on the rise, ample research suggests that people still harbor negative attitudes toward transgender individuals. My honors research in social cognition explores the issue of transgender stigma by examining the magnitude of association between people’s implicit and explicit attitudes toward images of transgender people, with a particular focus on the demographic and psychosocial variables that predict unfavorable reactions at the implicit and explicit levels. This research has the potential to enhance our limited understanding of potential motivations behind prejudice and discrimination targeted against transgender individuals and sheds light on the broader stigma against gender-nonconformity.

Notes

Session III, Panel 15 - Decisions, Decisions: Investigations of Hunches, Attitudes, and Responses
Moderator: Afia Ofori-Mensa, Visiting Assistant Professor of Comparative American Studies and Africana Studies

Major

Psychology; Violin Performance

Advisor(s)

Nancy Darling, Psychology
Gregory Fulkerson, Violin Performance

Project Mentor(s)

Cindy Frantz, Psychology

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Apr 29th, 4:00 PM Apr 29th, 5:15 PM

Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Towards Transgender People: The Role of Demographic and Psychosocial Variables

King Building 337

Although transgender visibility is on the rise, ample research suggests that people still harbor negative attitudes toward transgender individuals. My honors research in social cognition explores the issue of transgender stigma by examining the magnitude of association between people’s implicit and explicit attitudes toward images of transgender people, with a particular focus on the demographic and psychosocial variables that predict unfavorable reactions at the implicit and explicit levels. This research has the potential to enhance our limited understanding of potential motivations behind prejudice and discrimination targeted against transgender individuals and sheds light on the broader stigma against gender-nonconformity.