Event Title

Managing Racist Pasts: The Black Justice League’s Demand for Inclusion and Its Challenge to the Promise of Diversity

Presenter Information

Tomoyo Joshi, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 337

Start Date

4-29-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

4-29-2016 3:45 PM

Abstract

I will present the results of my honors thesis, in which I examine online diversity initiative pages, student activism, and administrative responses that took place in fall 2015 at Princeton University. In the first section, I analyze Princeton’s online diversity initiative page, “Many Voices, One Future,” by demonstrating how “diversity” becomes individualized, commodified, and quantified. In the second section, I investigate how the actions of and responses to the Black Justice League challenge the rhetoric of diversity that the administration embodies. Ultimately, I question the implications of demanding “inclusion” into the academy almost half a century after the struggle for ethnic studies.

Notes

Session II, Panel 9 - "On the Right Side of History": Studies of Structures, Agents, and Resistance
Moderator: Gina Perez, Associate Professor of Comparative American Studies

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin1462201278

Major

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

Advisor(s)

Ann Sherif, East Asian Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Jan Cooper, Rhetoric and Composition

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Apr 29th, 2:45 PM Apr 29th, 3:45 PM

Managing Racist Pasts: The Black Justice League’s Demand for Inclusion and Its Challenge to the Promise of Diversity

King Building 337

I will present the results of my honors thesis, in which I examine online diversity initiative pages, student activism, and administrative responses that took place in fall 2015 at Princeton University. In the first section, I analyze Princeton’s online diversity initiative page, “Many Voices, One Future,” by demonstrating how “diversity” becomes individualized, commodified, and quantified. In the second section, I investigate how the actions of and responses to the Black Justice League challenge the rhetoric of diversity that the administration embodies. Ultimately, I question the implications of demanding “inclusion” into the academy almost half a century after the struggle for ethnic studies.