Event Title

Quantifying Land Use and Erosion in Southwest China

Location

King Building 327

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-29-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

4-29-2016 5:15 PM

Abstract

Over two field seasons, we collected detrital river samples from rural Sichuan, China. Short-lived radioisotope data from the detrital samples constrains timing and magnitude of response to modern Chinese land-use policies. We used geographic information systems (GIS) as an analytical tool to calculate geomorphological change in the area. Our GIS work in one of the field areas reveals dramatic widening of the river channel in response to the largest flood in 60 years. One field area additionally allows us to constrain the relative influence of tectonics and land use on erosion.

Notes

Session III, Panel 14 - Codifying Nature, Understanding History: Geological Translations of Water and Soil
Moderator: Bruce Simonson, Professor of Geology

Record for Megan Curiel. Additional record for Zanna Doak: https://digitalcommons.oberlin.edu/seniorsymp/2016/presentations/13/

Major

Geology

Advisor(s)

Karla Hubbard, Geology
Bruce Simonson, Geology

Project Mentor(s)

Amanda Schmidt, Geology

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Apr 29th, 4:00 PM Apr 29th, 5:15 PM

Quantifying Land Use and Erosion in Southwest China

King Building 327

Over two field seasons, we collected detrital river samples from rural Sichuan, China. Short-lived radioisotope data from the detrital samples constrains timing and magnitude of response to modern Chinese land-use policies. We used geographic information systems (GIS) as an analytical tool to calculate geomorphological change in the area. Our GIS work in one of the field areas reveals dramatic widening of the river channel in response to the largest flood in 60 years. One field area additionally allows us to constrain the relative influence of tectonics and land use on erosion.