Event Title

Breaking Down “Development”: A Music Theoretical Approach to Understanding Journey in Music

Presenter Information

Henry Aberle, Oberlin CollegeFollow

Location

King Building 327

Start Date

4-29-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

4-29-2016 3:45 PM

Abstract

Theodor Adorno once stated that the music of Stravinsky, unlike Beethoven, was flawed because it lacked thematic material. His statement points to the necessity of motivic development, which implies a logical journey through mutations of thematic material. Adorno’s harsh definition of what qualifies as a motive led me to investigate how we perceive motive and large-scale form. By synthesizing and then comparing Adorno’s conceptualization of motive with the theories of organicism and developing variation, this project aims to question a simplistic understanding of thematic composition. Theoretical analysis will include works by Beethoven, Debussy, and Schoenberg.

Notes

Session II, Panel 8 - Mapping the Intangible: Meditations on Musical Meaning
Moderator: Jared Hartt, Associate Professor of Music Theory

Major

East Asian Studies; Musical Studies

Advisor(s)

Suzanne Gay, East Asian Studies
Jan Miyake, Music Theory

Project Mentor(s)

Ben Geyer, Music Theory

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Apr 29th, 2:45 PM Apr 29th, 3:45 PM

Breaking Down “Development”: A Music Theoretical Approach to Understanding Journey in Music

King Building 327

Theodor Adorno once stated that the music of Stravinsky, unlike Beethoven, was flawed because it lacked thematic material. His statement points to the necessity of motivic development, which implies a logical journey through mutations of thematic material. Adorno’s harsh definition of what qualifies as a motive led me to investigate how we perceive motive and large-scale form. By synthesizing and then comparing Adorno’s conceptualization of motive with the theories of organicism and developing variation, this project aims to question a simplistic understanding of thematic composition. Theoretical analysis will include works by Beethoven, Debussy, and Schoenberg.