Event Title

Gaels, Galls and Friars: The Dominican Order and Ethnic Tension in Ireland, 1224-1536

Presenter Information

Sarah Blenko, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A142

Start Date

4-24-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 2:30 PM

Abstract

When the Dominicans arrived in Ireland in 1224, they entered a society plagued by warfare and constant conflict, especially between the native Gaelic Irish and the colonizing Anglo-Normans. Despite edicts from the highest levels of the order that emphasized these cultural differences, the Dominicans operated within these pluralistic communities, negotiating ethnic conflict to ultimately become a successful and well-loved institution. This project explores how Dominican friars living and working in Ireland were able to depart from these directives and engage with both Gaelic Irish and Anglo-Normans in ways that endeared them to both populations.

Notes

Session 1, Panel 6 - Studies in Engagement, Resistance, and Agency
Moderator: Elizabeth Hamilton, Associate Professor of German Language and Literatures

Major

Archaeology; Medieval Studies

Advisor(s)

Erik Inglis, Art History
Susan Kane, Archaeology
Ellen Wurtzel, History

Project Mentor(s)

Ellen Wurtzel, History

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Apr 24th, 1:30 PM Apr 24th, 2:30 PM

Gaels, Galls and Friars: The Dominican Order and Ethnic Tension in Ireland, 1224-1536

Science Center, A142

When the Dominicans arrived in Ireland in 1224, they entered a society plagued by warfare and constant conflict, especially between the native Gaelic Irish and the colonizing Anglo-Normans. Despite edicts from the highest levels of the order that emphasized these cultural differences, the Dominicans operated within these pluralistic communities, negotiating ethnic conflict to ultimately become a successful and well-loved institution. This project explores how Dominican friars living and working in Ireland were able to depart from these directives and engage with both Gaelic Irish and Anglo-Normans in ways that endeared them to both populations.