Event Title

An Ethic of Care: Trans* Children, Hormone Therapy, and Parental Responsibility

Presenter Information

Anna Field, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-24-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 2:30 PM

Abstract

How do we quantify autonomy in persons under 18 years of age? Children have limited social and political agency and operate almost entirely under the umbrella of parental guidance. Due to this, there has historically been controversy associated with trans* children, who do not identify with the gender to which they were assigned at birth, and wish not to be identified as such. Many of these children wish to undergo hormone therapy and reassign their gender, but given the previously stated age/autonomy constraints, this often does not manifest in ways that benefit the child. My research examines the ethics associated with parental responsibility, in contrast with the child’s autonomy, and how these factors can coexist more fluidly.

Notes

Session 1, Panel 3 - Agency and Taxonomy: Case Studies in Ethics, Politics, and Science
Moderator: Dorit Ganson, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Major

Philosophy

Advisor(s)

Dorit Ganson, Philosophy

Project Mentor(s)

Dorit Ganson, Philosophy

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Apr 24th, 1:30 PM Apr 24th, 2:30 PM

An Ethic of Care: Trans* Children, Hormone Therapy, and Parental Responsibility

Science Center, A254

How do we quantify autonomy in persons under 18 years of age? Children have limited social and political agency and operate almost entirely under the umbrella of parental guidance. Due to this, there has historically been controversy associated with trans* children, who do not identify with the gender to which they were assigned at birth, and wish not to be identified as such. Many of these children wish to undergo hormone therapy and reassign their gender, but given the previously stated age/autonomy constraints, this often does not manifest in ways that benefit the child. My research examines the ethics associated with parental responsibility, in contrast with the child’s autonomy, and how these factors can coexist more fluidly.