Event Title

Sin in Hiding: Re-Envisioning Contemporary Christian Theology Through Shame-Talk

Presenter Information

Timothy Woods, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, K209

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-25-2014 4:00 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 5:15 PM

Abstract

My project addresses problematic beliefs dominant in contemporary Christian theological anthropology regarding sin and identity. I contend that the incorporation of psychodynamically informed interdisciplinary discourse on shame, a broad network of intractable relational phenomena suffused within Christian theology, better enables the Christian worldview to inclusively confront the inevitable existence of sin. My theological appropriation of shametalk focuses on four elements: first, due attention to the social dynamics of identity formation; second, discussion of subsequent social exposure and vulnerability, termed “original shame”; third, reexamination of sin as hiding or concealment; and fourth, reconsideration of the particular manifestation of sin within the context of hiding.

Notes

Session III, Panel 16 - “A city set on a hill cannot be hid”: Studies of Religious Authority
Moderator: Steven Wojtal, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Geology

Major

Religion

Advisor(s)

James Swan Tuite, Religion

Project Mentor(s)

David Kamitsuka, Religion

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Apr 25th, 4:00 PM Apr 25th, 5:15 PM

Sin in Hiding: Re-Envisioning Contemporary Christian Theology Through Shame-Talk

Science Center, K209

My project addresses problematic beliefs dominant in contemporary Christian theological anthropology regarding sin and identity. I contend that the incorporation of psychodynamically informed interdisciplinary discourse on shame, a broad network of intractable relational phenomena suffused within Christian theology, better enables the Christian worldview to inclusively confront the inevitable existence of sin. My theological appropriation of shametalk focuses on four elements: first, due attention to the social dynamics of identity formation; second, discussion of subsequent social exposure and vulnerability, termed “original shame”; third, reexamination of sin as hiding or concealment; and fourth, reconsideration of the particular manifestation of sin within the context of hiding.