Event Title

Luteinizing Hormone and the Brain: Implications for Post-Menopausal Memory Decline

Presenter Information

Veronica Burnham, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A155

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-25-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

Estrogen has long been studied for its positive impact on memory. Some hypothesize that decreasing estrogen in menopause causes the increase in risk for Alzheimer’s disease observed in post-menopausal women. However, estrogen replacement therapy has not proven to be an effective preventative measure, failing to consistently improve memory while increasing the risk of breast cancer. Exciting research from our lab indicates that a related hormone, luteinizing hormone, which increases dramatically after menopause, may play a role in memory decline. Intracranial injections of luteinizing hormone are shown to impair spatial memory formation in female rats, while blocking luteinizing hormone activity can rescue these deficits.

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Meiosis, Memory, Mutation: Studies in Reproduction, Menopause, and Ovarian Cancer
Moderator: Tracie Paine, Associate Professor of Neuroscience

Major

Neuroscience

Advisor(s)

Jan Thornton, Neuroscience

Project Mentor(s)

Jan Thornton, Neuroscience

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Apr 25th, 1:30 PM Apr 25th, 2:30 PM

Luteinizing Hormone and the Brain: Implications for Post-Menopausal Memory Decline

Science Center, A155

Estrogen has long been studied for its positive impact on memory. Some hypothesize that decreasing estrogen in menopause causes the increase in risk for Alzheimer’s disease observed in post-menopausal women. However, estrogen replacement therapy has not proven to be an effective preventative measure, failing to consistently improve memory while increasing the risk of breast cancer. Exciting research from our lab indicates that a related hormone, luteinizing hormone, which increases dramatically after menopause, may play a role in memory decline. Intracranial injections of luteinizing hormone are shown to impair spatial memory formation in female rats, while blocking luteinizing hormone activity can rescue these deficits.