Event Title

Parasites of the Damselfly Ischnura verticalis: Relationships to Sex and Egg Load

Presenter Information

Ben Garfinkel, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A154

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-25-2014 2:45 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 3:45 PM

Abstract

Found in every county in the state, the damselfly Ischnura verticalis (order: Odonata) is the most common damselfly in Ohio. This project explores, first, the diversity and intraspecific distribution of endo- and ectoparasites within I. verticalis populations and, second, the potential fitness costs of protozoan gregarine parasitism in I. verticalis. We demonstrate a female bias on gregarine intensity and prevalence. Collection site, but not gregarine intensity, had an effect on female egg load. Learning about these interspecific relationships informs future odonate research, as well as the study of fitness costs of parasite-mediated selection across other organisms.

Notes

Session II, Panel 6 - Experiments in Root Formation, Damselfly Parasites, and Intestinal Fortitude
Moderator: Marta Laskowski, Professor of Biology

Major

Biology

Advisor(s)

Keith Tarvin, Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Chris Anderson, Biology

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Apr 25th, 2:45 PM Apr 25th, 3:45 PM

Parasites of the Damselfly Ischnura verticalis: Relationships to Sex and Egg Load

Science Center, A154

Found in every county in the state, the damselfly Ischnura verticalis (order: Odonata) is the most common damselfly in Ohio. This project explores, first, the diversity and intraspecific distribution of endo- and ectoparasites within I. verticalis populations and, second, the potential fitness costs of protozoan gregarine parasitism in I. verticalis. We demonstrate a female bias on gregarine intensity and prevalence. Collection site, but not gregarine intensity, had an effect on female egg load. Learning about these interspecific relationships informs future odonate research, as well as the study of fitness costs of parasite-mediated selection across other organisms.