Event Title

Analysis of an RNAi-Induced Defect in the Caenorhabditis elegans Defecation Motor Program

Presenter Information

Trip Freeburg, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A154

Start Date

4-25-2014 2:45 PM

End Date

4-25-2014 3:45 PM

Abstract

Caenorhabditis elegans undergoes a rhythmic three-step defecation motor program involving the intestine, neurons, and muscles. A genetic screen identified a mutant that dramatically reduces the frequency of the final step of this motor program. The mutant was generated with RNAi, a technique that lowers levels of specific proteins. To determine which cells were important, I limited RNAi to either the intestine or neurons. Intestine-specific RNAi reproduced the defect, while neuron-specific RNAi did not. I also performed optogenetic and pharmacological experiments to further test whether RNAi affected certain neurons and muscles. These experiments suggested that muscles and neurons may be affected.

Notes

Session II, Panel 6 - Experiments in Root Formation, Damselfly Parasites, and Intestinal Fortitude
Moderator: Marta Laskowski, Professor of Biology

Major

Biology

Advisor(s)

Katherine Cullen, Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Maureen Peters, Biology

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Apr 25th, 2:45 PM Apr 25th, 3:45 PM

Analysis of an RNAi-Induced Defect in the Caenorhabditis elegans Defecation Motor Program

Science Center, A154

Caenorhabditis elegans undergoes a rhythmic three-step defecation motor program involving the intestine, neurons, and muscles. A genetic screen identified a mutant that dramatically reduces the frequency of the final step of this motor program. The mutant was generated with RNAi, a technique that lowers levels of specific proteins. To determine which cells were important, I limited RNAi to either the intestine or neurons. Intestine-specific RNAi reproduced the defect, while neuron-specific RNAi did not. I also performed optogenetic and pharmacological experiments to further test whether RNAi affected certain neurons and muscles. These experiments suggested that muscles and neurons may be affected.