Event Title

We Were Never Meant to Survive: A Localized Discussion of Historic Erasure, Black Churchwomen, and Possible Solutions in Cleveland, Ohio

Presenter Information

Tiesha Cassel, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A155

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 4:00 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

My project explores historic erasure and its effects on the preservation of Black churchwomen’s histories in archive spaces. In 2012, in the archives of the Western Reserve Historical Society and the Cleveland Public library, I searched for the stories of churchwomen in Cleveland’s Black Baptist community. My search yielded little; it left me with barely a glimpse into these women’s lives and led me to interrogate what archival spaces mean for the histories of Black churchwomen. My research uses historic recreation to investigate the historic erasure in archival spaces of Black churchwomen and their experiences.

Notes

Session III, Panel 12: The Boundaries of Community: Case Studies in Historical Memory, Post-Urbanism, and Contemporary Christianity
Moderator: Daphne Johns, Associate Professor of Sociology

Major

Religion

Advisor(s)

A.G. Miller, Religion

Project Mentor(s)

A.G. Miller, Religion

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Apr 26th, 4:00 PM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

We Were Never Meant to Survive: A Localized Discussion of Historic Erasure, Black Churchwomen, and Possible Solutions in Cleveland, Ohio

Science Center, A155

My project explores historic erasure and its effects on the preservation of Black churchwomen’s histories in archive spaces. In 2012, in the archives of the Western Reserve Historical Society and the Cleveland Public library, I searched for the stories of churchwomen in Cleveland’s Black Baptist community. My search yielded little; it left me with barely a glimpse into these women’s lives and led me to interrogate what archival spaces mean for the histories of Black churchwomen. My research uses historic recreation to investigate the historic erasure in archival spaces of Black churchwomen and their experiences.