Event Title

Teaching History in Post-Conflict Societies: The Case of Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

Presenter Information

Maggie Paulin, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A155

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 1:30 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 2:30 PM

Abstract

What is the role of education in a post-conflict society and how is history taught in a country that cannot agree upon its past? This project explores these questions within the context of Guatemala, where a 36-year civil war and genocide (1960-96) have resulted in a contested and fragmented national narrative. Based upon my observations of history classes in three high schools in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, I consider how the actions and words of individual teachers challenge and support the dominant narrative of the past and complicate the path towards a peaceful future. It is in the space of the classroom, I believe, that the past is made present.

Notes

Session I, Panel 2: The Weight of a Nightmare: Making Sense of History in Guatemala, Chile, and Argentina
Moderator: Patrick O'Connor, Chair of Hispanic Studies and Associate Professor of Comparative Literature

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?0::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:5026

Major

Latin American Studies

Advisor(s)

Steve Volk, Latin American Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Steve Volk, Latin American Studies

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Apr 26th, 1:30 PM Apr 26th, 2:30 PM

Teaching History in Post-Conflict Societies: The Case of Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

Science Center, A155

What is the role of education in a post-conflict society and how is history taught in a country that cannot agree upon its past? This project explores these questions within the context of Guatemala, where a 36-year civil war and genocide (1960-96) have resulted in a contested and fragmented national narrative. Based upon my observations of history classes in three high schools in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, I consider how the actions and words of individual teachers challenge and support the dominant narrative of the past and complicate the path towards a peaceful future. It is in the space of the classroom, I believe, that the past is made present.