Event Title

An Archaeometric Study of Black Gloss Ceramics from Monte Pallano, Abruzzo

Presenter Information

Akemi Berry, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, K209

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 1:30 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 2:30 PM

Abstract

This study examines the reliability of geochemical data for determining the provenance of black-gloss pottery. Samples of black-gloss ware from Monte Pallano (Abruzzo, Italy), dating from the first through fourth centuries B.C., were analyzed using XRF and SEM-EDS techniques. Geochemical analysis is useful for provenance studies of naturally occurring rocks, but becomes more difficult when examining engineered materials, such as ceramics. Geochemical and archaeometric techniques were compared to determine chemical correlations and mineralogical constraints on identification. While correlations within the datasets arose, comparison of the analytical methods revealed mineral constraints on pottery classes, but chemical and mineralogical data were uncorrelated.

Notes

Session I, Panel 5: Metals/Models/Method: Notes on Environmental Exposure, Climatology, and Geochemical Dating Techniques
Moderator: Dennis Hubbard, Professor of Geology

Major

Archaeology; Geology

Advisor(s)

Susan Kane, Archaeology
Dennis Hubbard, Geology

Project Mentor(s)

Susan Kane, Archaeology
Zeb Page, Geology

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Apr 26th, 1:30 PM Apr 26th, 2:30 PM

An Archaeometric Study of Black Gloss Ceramics from Monte Pallano, Abruzzo

Science Center, K209

This study examines the reliability of geochemical data for determining the provenance of black-gloss pottery. Samples of black-gloss ware from Monte Pallano (Abruzzo, Italy), dating from the first through fourth centuries B.C., were analyzed using XRF and SEM-EDS techniques. Geochemical analysis is useful for provenance studies of naturally occurring rocks, but becomes more difficult when examining engineered materials, such as ceramics. Geochemical and archaeometric techniques were compared to determine chemical correlations and mineralogical constraints on identification. While correlations within the datasets arose, comparison of the analytical methods revealed mineral constraints on pottery classes, but chemical and mineralogical data were uncorrelated.