Event Title

The Italian Madrigal, Anglicized: Modal Theory and Enharmonic Chromaticism

Presenter Information

Nicholas Osborne, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A154

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 1:30 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 2:30 PM

Abstract

Using Elizabethan madrigals, I will shed light on the role of modality in the expressive chromaticism that plays a strong role in this repertoire. In 16th-century Italy, the madrigal was a compositional venue for experimentation in musica ficta and temperament, as discussed in the (often polemical) treatises of Zarlino, Vicentino, and Lusitano. By the time Nicholas Yonge published his Italian madrigal anthology Musica Transalpina (1588), this genre was already being naturalized in England. This leads to questions of performance practice, textual analysis, and theoretical assimilation that I examine through critical analysis.

Notes

Session I, Panel 1: Modal Fanaticism / Infantile Fantasy: Experimentation and Expression in Musical Forms
Moderator: Rebecca Leydon, Associate Professor of Music Theory

Major

Musical Studies

Advisor(s)

Jared Hartt, Music Theory

Project Mentor(s)

Paul Cox, Musicology

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Apr 26th, 1:30 PM Apr 26th, 2:30 PM

The Italian Madrigal, Anglicized: Modal Theory and Enharmonic Chromaticism

Science Center, A154

Using Elizabethan madrigals, I will shed light on the role of modality in the expressive chromaticism that plays a strong role in this repertoire. In 16th-century Italy, the madrigal was a compositional venue for experimentation in musica ficta and temperament, as discussed in the (often polemical) treatises of Zarlino, Vicentino, and Lusitano. By the time Nicholas Yonge published his Italian madrigal anthology Musica Transalpina (1588), this genre was already being naturalized in England. This leads to questions of performance practice, textual analysis, and theoretical assimilation that I examine through critical analysis.